Episode Five: Mirrors

Mirrors is the 5th episode in The Ripple Project: ONE Series.

A friend’s reflection reveals more than a looking glass.

Renowned artist and clandestine Holocaust art scholar Marc Dennis interviews survivor Dina Jacobson, whose tranquil facade betrays an incomprehensible knowledge. Set in the bucolic village of Elmira in upstate New York, Marc’s inquisitive nature and Dina’s furtive life are revealed and reflected upon through days of frenzied conversation and the knowing silence of friends. Dina is one of six survivors interviewed by Marc, each story more complex and unique than the one before…

Filmmaker Liron Unreich follows Marc, as both artist attempt to create a multi-media musuem installation based on these six interviews. A journey that will take them across the United States and the Atlantic. As each survivor shares his or hers life and precious days, the two artists try to capture an enduring portrait of survival, spirit, strength and inspiration to be shared with generations to come.

 

Dina Jackobson

 

 

Portrait of Holocaust survivor Dina J. by artist Marc Dennis

Portrait of Holocaust survivor Dina J. by artist Marc Dennis

Project Status: In early stages of production

Return to Series ONE homepage

Two Ripple Project Vignettes to be screened in Jerusalem on March. 19th

The Ripple Project is excited to announce two of our Vignettes will be screened at the Mythographies conference in Jerusalem on March. 19th.

A Day at Zuccotti Park and Daniel Terna, Brooklyn, NY will be the two films included in the program.

Click the links to view the films and read more about the conference here.

Daniel Terna, Brooklyn NY

I first met Daniel Terna through his father, painter and Holocaust survivor Fred Terna. The Ripple Project has worked with Fred on several projects, including the multimedia exhibition Mirrors, and Shared Memory, a short film about his life of survival through art and creativity. At the premier of Shared Memory, Fred revealed to me he had a 20 something year old son named Daniel —  whose photography work was transitioning into the pursuit of film. Upon meeting Daniel at their brownstone in Brooklyn, I was surprised to learn this aspiring filmmaker was interested in making a film about his father’s road trips across the United States with his first wife Stella some 40 years ago. Inspired by images taken by Fred and Stella, Daniel set out fo retrace their travels, retake their images and frame the story of a woman who died before he was born. The short film Daniel Terna documents this journey of discovery for The Ripple Project’s Vignettes Series.

 

Excutive Producers: Micheal McDevitt and Liron Unreich

Directed by Dylan Angell

Director of Photography  Tal Unreich

Edited by Joe Morgan

Additional footage shot by Daniel Terna

Photos by Fred Terna

Music by Phantom Fauna

 

 

Daniela Schiller featured on Studio 360

Daniela Schiller who is featured in Reconsolidation, a segment of  The Ripple Project: One was recently featured on Studio 360 performing a monologue about her experience of being filmed by the Ripple Project. Listen to it here.

Halloween, Lower Mahattan 2012

 

This short film is in no way trying to give a sense of the scale of destruction that Hurricane Sandy caused NYC- compared to Redhook, the Rockaways and other parts of the city the destruction cause to lower Manhattan was comparitively slight but residents still had to endure days without power or access to basic needs as most  businesses were closed beneath 34th street. This is simply a document of some of the things we saw while biking around 2 days after the storm and an attempt to capture the strange quiet mood that engulfed the city. -Dylan Angell

Directed by Dylan Angell Camera by Daniel Terna Edited by Joe Morgan Music by Jeff Tobias

Executive Producers Liron Unreich and Michael McDevitt

Muse Films

The Ripple Project is very excited to announce our partnership with Muse Films and Television who are now working as our fiscal sponsor.

MUSE Film and Television is a non-profit executive production company that uses film and digital media to create quality films on visual art and culture. MUSE initiates projects, manages production and distribution, and disseminates films to the broadest possible audience.

MUSE coordinates and manages the production of films from inception to completion by creating partnerships with independent filmmakers, technical consultants, content advisors, broadcasters, and distributors. Using the most advanced technologies MUSE enriches its film projects through parallel productions, which include books, study-guides, DVDs, and websites.

MUSE’s mission is based on the belief that film is one of the most important ways to appreciate and understand art. By examining art through historical and cultural contexts, MUSE documentaries seek to enhance the art experience.

May Day

This week marks the one year anniversary of Occupy Wall Street. The May Day protests were one of the last major Occupy related protests to take place under the banner of the movement. After a relatively quiet winter May Day highlighted the crossroads that the movement was at, there were many questions to if the movement was growing too divided or if it could substain itself in any form and it’s hard to say if any of those questions were answered on May 1st. I felt disoriented throughout the day, unsure of what to make of the events that took place. I tried to create a video that matched the feeling I had.
-Dylan Angell
Directed by Dylan Angell
Shot by Ryan Hunter
Edited by Joe Morgan
Music by Gabe Celestino
Voices sampled from May Day Radio
Executive Producers Liron Unreich and Michael McDevitt

The Ripple Project ONE Promo 2012

Like a stone dropped into a pond, the Shoah created ripples. Radiating outward through the lives of individuals and communities, each one contains a story that continues to impact our lives. The Ripple Project:One is a film consisting of six 20-minute chapters, each documenting the lives of ordinary people living the ripple effect of extraordinary circumstances.

The film will introduce audiences to a sharp-minded poet in Maryland who has dedicated his life to recording the stories of fellow Shoah survivors; a grandfatherly painter in Brooklyn whose art provided a means of expressing, processing and sharing experiences beyond words; a New York-based Holocaust scholar and artist who visits a Jerusalem-based painter, survivor and friend hoping to encounter a living example of the courage of clandestine artists in the camps; a Rwandan genocide survivor documenting her journey as she seeks out the wisdom and guidance from a fading generation of Holocaust survivors; a Terezin survivor and star of the children’s opera Brundibar whose granddaughters in Florida who know little of their grandmother’s strength and nothing of her fame; A daughter discovers synchronicity between her scientific career and her father’s method of coping with his traumatic past.

While putting a human face on familiar, yet unfathomable, statistics, this character-driven narrative documentary highlights the multigenerational effect of genocide by giving audiences glimpses into the lives of survivors and their families living in communities much like our own in the United States, Europe and Israel. Each of the characters profiled conveys the responsibility of survivors and younger generations to pass on the lessons and experiences of the Shoah. Although the chapters are very much connected as present-day acts of historical remembrance, they are most basically human tales of the inheritance of creativity and the drive to share and preserve one’s own legacy and family story.

Return top